July 21, 2019

India Exempts Electric Vehicles From Permit Process

India To Get 1,000 New Electric Buses Next Year सियाम के 58 वे सालाना समारोह में भाग लिया।इस मौके पर ऑटोमोबिल इंडस्ट्री से अपील की अब अब समय आ गया है कि ऑटोमोबिल इंडस्ट्री जल परिवहन में पैसा लगाए।ईंधन की निर्यात लागत कम करने के लिए बायो फ्यूल और इलेक्ट्रिक से चलने वाले वाहनों की निर्माता कम्पनिया आगे आये। pic.twitter.com/FKhHVm8Tfv— Nitin Gadkari (@nitin_gadkari) September 6, 2018 Source: autowise.com, timesofindia.indiatimes.com Source: Electric Vehicle News India tries unconventional methods to promote EVsIndiaIndia is not a big market for all-electric or plug-in hybrid cars, but would like to be part of the electric revolution. The willingness to put electric cars on the roads in volume, lower emissions and fulfills the ambitions of establishing production facilities seems to be strong and perhaps even a bit desperate.The latest decision by the government is to exempt alternatively-powered vehicles (EVs, ethanol, biodiesel, CNG, methanol and biofuel) from all permit requirements. There is no timeline for the execution.This could, of course, make it easier to introduce more EV models, especially from smaller manufacturers, but at a cost of potential chaos and safety issues in the future.The other announced, possible move, is mandating cab aggregators (Uber, Ola) to have a certain percentage of the fleet with an electrified powertrain.See Also Renault Reportedly Working On Kwid Electric: Price Of $8,500 Exide Industries & Leclanché To Launch Lithium-Ion Battery JV Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 13, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

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Tesla Model 3 Performance Races Model X P100D Ford Falcon Drag Car

10 photos This video comes to us from YouTuber DAErik (Tesla owner Erik Strait), who’s clearly all over the Tesla scene in multiple capacities. Lately, he’s taken an affinity to hitting the drag strip in the mountains of Colorado. He seems to have a very good grasp of racing, so perhaps this is something he’s been doing for many years and has just started sharing. At any rate, he can keep the exciting videos coming.In addition to the Model 3 Performance’s stint against the Model X P100D, there is also a race against an old-school 1964 Ford Falcon that’s been readied for the strip. Check out the video to learn about the results.TESLA MODEL 3 PERFORMANCE DragTimes Pits Tesla Model 3 Performance Against BMW M3 The little guy races the big guy, and more.Just yesterday, we shared a few Tesla Model X P100D racing videos with you. We mentioned that Tesla’s biggest sibling doesn’t get as much attention or racing coverage than its faster sibling, the Tesla Model S P100D. Additionally, both cars have actually been pushed aside as of late, since the Tesla Model 3 Performance has arrived. In this latest video, we get to see the hefty Model X P100D face off against the much smaller Model 3 Performance.Tesla Model 3 Performance In Action: Watch Tesla Model 3 Performance Take Down Ford Mustang 5.0 Motor Trend Pits Tesla Model 3 Performance Against I-Pace, Alfa Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 2, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News read more

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Road Test 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SEL AWD

first_imgSource: Electric, Hybrid, Clean Diesel & High-MPG Vehicles A Slightly Underpowered, But Stylish and Comfortable Subcompact SUVMitsubishi’s subcompact Outlander Sport crossover SUV has been the automaker’s best-selling vehicle in the U.S until the larger three-row Outlander took over the spot this year. In the very competitive compact SUV segment, the Sport’s ES base trim starts at a very thrifty $20,295 (plus $895 destination charges), which is $4,645 less than the larger three-row Outlander ES.Following in its big brother’s footsteps, the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport is offered in ES, SE and SEL trim levels. As typical, each trim is available with either front- or all-wheel drive.  Not typical, the base ES is offered with a five-speed manual transmission. All other models come standard with a continously-variable transmission (CVT). For motivation, the base ES is equipped with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder, while the balance of the lineup is standard with a more powerful 2.4-liter four.Little brother wants you to know he’s here, tooFuel economy plays a part in the decision to buy most vehicles in this class, and the Outlander Sport offers good, but not great numbers. The EPA estimates fuel economy for the 2.0-liter engine with the manual transmission at 23 mpg city/29 highway/25 combined. With the CVT, it’s 24 mpg city/30 highway/27 combined. Adding optional all-wheel drive (which requires the CVT) results in 23 mpg city/29 highway/26 combined.Moving up to the larger powerplant is a small fuel economy penalty with front drive models returning 23 mpg city/28 highway/25 combined according to the EPA. All-wheel drive versions see 22 mpg city/27 mpg highway/24 mpg combined.Underneath the HoodFor get-up-and-go, the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport relies on the two engines it started with in 2011. The base is a forgettable aluminum block 2.0-liter four that puts out a whimpering 148 horsepower and 145 pounds-feet of torque, which is overwhelmed by the car’s 3,200-pound weight. Unless most of your driving is on city streets, I don’t recommend this engine.Don’t skimp when it comes to engine choiceInstead, get the available 2.4-liter four-cylinder. At 168 horsepower it’s no powerhouse, but it doesn’t have to work as hard to get the Outlander Sport moving, so it’s quieter as well as offering more punch. The CVT mimics a standard transmission with “shift” points and is fairly smooth. Opt for the SEL or GT trim and you’ll find paddle shifters that make up or downshifts convenient.All-wheel drive traction is courtesy of Mitsubishi’s S-AWC system, an acronym for Super All Wheel Control. It automatically directs power rearward whenever the front wheels begin slipping, offering peace of mind on rain-slicked roads as well as snow-covered highways. While the S-AWC stystem doesn’t turn the Sport into a potent off-roader, it can lock all four wheels for added low-speed traction, and the  8.5-inch ground clearance makes it an acceptable vehicle for Forest Service trails and roads.The Outlander Sport uses the same suspension setup as the larger Outlander—a MacPherson strut layout in front with a trailing multi-link at the rear. This configuration delivers a smooth ride quality but falls short when it comes to handling dynamics.Stands Apart from the CrowdMitsubishi gave the Outlander a styling refresh last year. For 2018 it gets a revised front and rear bumper design with new LED running lights and new accent pieces.For someone looking for something differentThe 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport unabashedly stands out from the large group of cookie-cutter crossovers with a distinct SUV appearance that’s in tune with a design direction called “Dynamic Shield.” There’s simple chrome detailing on the grille and window line, and a rising character line that reaches from the front wheel arch to the back of the rear doors to break up the slab-sided look. The proportions are spot-on; with standard 18-inch wheels, it’s an aggressive design that looks good.Inside, the Outlander Sport’s interior won’t grab any design awards, but beautiful cabin designs don’t always place the controls in intuitive places. Our test SEL cabin may not have been high art, but the controls were all pretty much where you’d want them to be and easy to understand. The hooded speedometer and rev counter featured crisp white backlighting and numerals that were easily read at a glance. The interior was complemented by piano-black accents, bright trim around the center stack and a new-for-2018 7.0-inch touch screen.As for the materials themselves, everything I touched felt on the inexpensive side, but nothing felt flimsy either. The quality of the plastics wasn’t bargain bin, and nothing felt liable to break, but at the same time, it was pretty clear that materials quality trailed the competition.Comfort and SurpriseComfortable front seats were supportive over a long drive, and the accommodating back seat is a pleasant surprise. Despite this crossover’s compact dimensions, adults should have no problem getting comfortable in the second row. As for those with little ones, there’s minimal effort to install two car seats.The interior of the Outlander Sport looks larger than it actually is. It’s practical with a low loading cargo floor and split-folding rear seat backs. Open the rear hatch and you’ll find 21.7 cubic feet of cargo space, which is more room than many of its competitors offer. Fold the rear seats down and this area expands to 49.5 cubic feet.The Outlander Sport has some good surprises insideThe base 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport ES offers some solid features for its roughly $20,000 price, including leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, automatic climate control, steering-wheel-mounted cruise control and audio buttons, a four-speaker/140-watt AM/FM/CD system, LED taillights and 18-inch alloy wheels.Our SEL with all-wheel drive brought keyless entry, fog lights, power-folding mirrors, a rearview camera, heated front leather seats, an eight-way power-adjustable driver’s seat, steering-wheel-mounted gearshift paddles, 7.0-inch touchscreen compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto and a six-speaker audio system with satellite radio. With the added Touring Package that included a panoramic glass roof, Fosgate audio system, forward collision mitigation and lane departure warning, the out-the-door price totaled $29,110.Safety systems included hill-start assist, stability control, anti-lock disc brakes and seven standard airbags, plus a driver’s-side knee airbag. However, it offers no advanced driver assists, which typically include things like blind spot monitoring and adaptive cruise control.On the RoadA tilt/telescoping steering column along with the power height adjustment made easy work of finding a comfortable driving position in our Outlander Sport SEL. Exceptional outward visibility and sight lines made it an easy car to drive on the freeway, in urban environments and crowded shopping mall parking lots.Several competitors offer higher horsepower and torque numbers, but I found the engine to be more than adequate for the task of motivating the 3,200 pound cute-ute, although at 9.5 seconds, the 0-to-60 mph sprint wasn’t much of an adrenaline rush.Acquitting itself well in a tough fieldOverall, I was, and think most folks will be, pleased with the 2.4-liter four. It wasn’t a barn burner, but the car accelerated quickly enough for anxiety-free freeway merging. However, passing on two-lane roads required cautionary thinking. When hard, quick acceleration was needed, the engine felt a little sluggish, and the raucous drone created by the CVT was loud and annoying.Although the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SEL doesn’t offer a sport-tuned suspension, it does have steering wheel mounted paddle shifters. The driver can activate manual shifting by touching one of the paddles (right for up-shifts, left for down-shifts). It will hold a down-shift when rounding a tight curve or when traffic ahead begins to slow.The Sport’s suspension goes the middle road between firmness and comfort. It provided a controlled ride on the highway and smoothed out problems on the road, keeping its composure quite well on rough pavement, while dealing with potholes in typical small car fashion—jarring at times.Mitsubishi’s electric-assisted power steering is better than most. It was light, yet accurate and responsive overall, and the little SUV felt competent when changing direction.You can erase the word “sport” from your mind. The Outlander Sport is not a carve-the-corners, athletic small crossover, and it doesn’t try to be one.When Mitsubishi delivered the Outlander Sport SEL, the fuel mileage readout was an even 24 mpg, the EPA’s estimated number. Our week of driving was fairly reflective of an average owner—a long freeway trip, in-town stop-and-go traffic and a leisurely Sunday afternoon drive in the country. After adding our 325 miles to the odometer, the pint-size crossover yielded 27.3 mpg, more than the EPA’s combined estimate.In the MarketplaceFor many shoppers, the best feature of the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport will be its price tag. While other subcompact SUVs offer a sub-$20,000 model, they won’t come with standard auto climate control and a 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty. Even a nicely equipped top-of-the-line SEL with all-wheel drive barely touches the $25,000 zone.Maybe “Sport” should be replaced with “Value”Despite the Outlander Sport’s low price and great warranty, there are a number of all-star competitors that are much newer, like the Mazda CX-3 which pleases with a zippy engine and superb handling. If fuel economy is a priority, Honda’s HR-V will hit the spot, plus its versatile rear seat can fit passengers just as well as it can fit a big-screen TV. For off-road enthusiasts, a little ruggedness is cool with Jeep’s Renegade. And then there’s the charming and affordable Fiat 500X, among others.In the end, value is an eye-of-the-beholder metric. Buyers on limited budgets seeking escape through the maze of small crossovers will find much to like about the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport. Affordable, nicely equipped and solidly constructed, the 2018 Outlander Sport gives buyers a shot at driving something a bit less commonplace without risking worry about long-term reliability.In order to give you the best perspective on the many vehicles available, Clean Fleet Report has a variety of contributors. When possible, we will offer you multiple perspectives on a given vehicle. This comes under SRO-Second Road Test Opinion. We hope you’ll enjoy these diverse views–some are just below—and let us know what you think in comments below or at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.Our other review of the 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport is here.Related Stories You Might Enjoy—More Subcompact CrossoversRoad Test: 2018 Mazda CX-3Road Trip: 2018 Ford EcosportRoad Test: 2016 Honda HR-VNews: 2018 Nissan KicksRoad Test: 2018 Toyota CH-RRoad Test: 2017 Jeep RenegadeRoad Test: 2016 Fiat 500XRoad Test: 2015 Chevrolet TraxDisclosure:Clean Fleet Report is loaned free test vehicles from automakers to evaluate, typically for a week at a time. Our road tests are based on this one-week drive of a new vehicle. Because of this we don’t address issues such as long-term reliability or total cost of ownership. In addition, we are often invited to manufacturer events highlighting new vehicles or technology. As part of these events we may be offered free transportation, lodging or meals. We do our best to present our unvarnished evaluations of vehicles and news irrespective of these inducements.Our focus is on vehicles that offer the best fuel economy in their class, which leads us to emphasize electric cars, plug-in hybrids, hybrids and diesels. We also feature those efficient gas-powered vehicles that are among the top mpg vehicles in their class. In addition, we aim to offer reviews and news on advanced technology and the alternative fuel vehicle market. We welcome any feedback from vehicle owners and are dedicated to providing a forum for alternative viewpoints. Please let us know your views at publisher@cleanfleetreport.com.The post Road Test: 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport SEL AWD appeared first on Clean Fleet Report.last_img read more

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More Audi ETron Sportback Electric Spy Photos Surface

first_img Audi e-tron Featured By Fully Charged In Abu Dhabi: Video 8 photos The question is when we will see the unveiling of the production version. It could be in September at the Frankfurt Motor Show maybe, as production should start by the end of this year. That is, provided Audi stays on track with its original timeline.We expect this Sportback version to use the same all-electric powertrain as the e-tron SUV. Source: Electric Vehicle News The Audi e-tron Sportback electric was seen again.More Audi e-tron Sportback spy photos landed in our inbox, which enables us to closely look at the test mule in winter scenery.As you can see, the Sportback’s front cleary reminds us of the Audi e-tron – the lights, front grill. The main difference is in the rear. Audi expects that the different style will attract more buyers to the e-tron, rather than by just having the conventional SUV alone.Audi New Version Of More Powerful Audi E-Tron Spied: E-Tron Allroad? Credit: CarPix Audi E-Tron Sportback Electric Car Spied Winter Testing Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 26, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Rimacs April Fools Super Buggy Could Become Real

first_img Check Out The New Rimac C_Two With Nico Rosberg: Video If you want to learn more about the engineering of the Rimac C-Two chassis, we recommended watching its creator Mate Rimac being interviewed by Former F1 champ Nico Rosberg at the Geneva Motor Show. There’s a ton of great information there. If you have your own ideas for some crazy battery-powered concoction that could use the carbon-fiber core of the C-Two, be sure to let us know in Comments. Source: Instagram For those of you who were not sure what the monocoque at Geneva Motor Show was for… hope this clarifies your query – it is the world’s fastest electric buggy! #Rimac #buggyA post shared by Rimac Automobili (@rimac_automobili) on Apr 1, 2019 at 10:08am PDT The best lies contain a kernel of truthOn the first day of April, the internet is traditionally littered with images of altered vehicles in search of a laugh. For 2019, Rimac Automobili got into the action and issued its own amusing render of a sort of super buggy on its social channels. Based on the carbon-fiber bones of its C-Two all-electric supercar, and wearing aggressive off-road capable shoes emblazoned with the moniker B_UGGY, we think it actually looks pretty awesome. If you also like it, then good news: some version of it could become a reality.More with Rimac Automobili See The Rimac C_Two Up Close In New Video On Instagram, the company said (embedded below), “April fools and all, but mark our words, when we get a spare month, this is happening.” We really hope this is no joke because the potential for awesomeness is higher than the Himalayas. Which, if it had the same 1,914 horses and 1,696 pound-feet of torque as the supercar sibling, it could probably scale with ease. And very quickly.If you check out the bare chassis in the images below, you can easily see the potential for a number of configurations. Remove the crash structures and the wheels leave little overhang space front and back. This gives it optimal approach and departure angles. And, with the suspension all directly connected to the monoque, there is pretty much zero flex. View this post on Instagram In Horsepower War, Rimac C_Two Proves Electric Cars Can’t Be Matched Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 3, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Greenberg Traurigs Demetrius McDaniel Appointed to Greater Austin Chamber of Commerce Board

first_imgMcDaniel, a University of Texas School of Law graduate, is a member of the firm’s executive committee and the chair of the firm’s Texas Government Law & Policy Practice . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Password Lost your password? Remember mecenter_img Username Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

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Fox Rothschild Dallas Managing Partner Clint David Appointed to AiRS Foundation Board

first_img Lost your password? The AiRS Foundation is a nonprofit dedicated to providing women access to options and funding for breast reconstruction surgery after mastectomies due to breast cancer . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Remember me Passwordcenter_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Usernamelast_img

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Willkie Farr Gallagher advises on 525 million sale of Samson Resources II

first_img Lost your password? Password Username Remember mecenter_img By Claire Poole (Aug. 1) Samson Resources II announced Tuesday the sale of $525 million in East Texas and Louisiana oil and gas assets to Houston-based Rockcliff Energy II. Willkie Farr & Gallagher advised. The sale is part of a Samson II plan to pay down debt. Details are in The Texas Lawbook.You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

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July 20, 2019

Sea otters falling prey to great white sharks

first_imgThe death rate of California sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) from great white shark attacks has risen dramatically in the last decade, researchers report  online today in Marine Mammal Science. By analyzing annual records from the U.S. Geological Survey going back to 1985, they found the percentage of dead otters with evidence of shark bites tripled from 19% in 1990 to 61% in 2013. The death rates started rapidly accelerating in 2003, and the pace is still on the rise today. Researchers say the trend is a bit mysterious, as great whites aren’t thought to hunt otters, preferring fatty seals and sea lions. It could be that the sharks are simply sampling the otters. But even though the great whites don’t swallow, the “investigatory bites” are still fatal, often by causing infections. Why are these shark-related deaths on the rise? One theory is that legal protections have boosted shark populations around the places where otters live. Whatever the reason, the death rate is high enough that it may be hampering recovery of the sea otter population in California, which remains a fraction of its historic size.last_img read more

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In symbolic move Congress votes to gut Obama climate plans

first_img“As we know, the president and other leaders are meeting in France as we speak here today. They’re speaking in generalities; they’re not being detailed in their plans,” Representative Ed Whitfield (R–KY), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Energy and Power Subcommittee, said on the House floor before the votes. Republicans, and a few Democrats, have charged that any deal to curb greenhouse gas emissions will drive up energy prices and cost jobs.Double-barreled attackThe legislative measures represent one of two lines of attack that Republicans are now using to thwart the president’s climate policies. In Congress, they are attempting to use the lawmaking process to undermine the new regulations under the Clean Air Act. At the same time, a number of states, industry groups, and companies have taken the fight to the courts, asking judges to overturn EPA’s rules for new power plants. The lawsuits, however, are still pending and won’t be resolved before climate negotiations in Paris finish.At issue is Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which includes two EPA regulations that are the first ever to limit greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector. One regulation sets limits for carbon dioxide emissions from new and future power plants. The other, which became effective in August, sets similar limits on existing power plants, though it offers a menu of options—ranging from energy-efficiency measures to renewable energy to emissions trading—that states can use to achieve the emissions limits. The power plan seeks to cut CO2 emissions from the power sector—which accounts for one-third of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions—by 30% from 2005 levels by 2025.The White House has said it will veto the congressional measures, saying in a statement that they threaten “the health and economic welfare of future generations by blocking important standards to reduce carbon pollution from the power sector that take a flexible, common sense approach to addressing carbon pollution.”The measures make use of a parliamentary tool under the Congressional Review Act that lawmakers can use to overturn regulations. Known as “resolutions of disapproval,” they differ from normal bills in that they can’t face filibusters in the Senate. That means that they only require a simple-majority support to clear the Senate instead of 60 votes.The GOP-controlled Senate acted first. Although S.J. Res. 24 and S.J. Res 23 had bipartisan cosponsors in the Senate, they ultimately passed the upper chamber almost solely with Republican support, on votes of 52 to 46 each in mid-November. Then, yesterday evening, the GOP-controlled House passed S.J. Res. 24, the regulation for existing power plants, on a 242 to 180 vote. S.J. Res. 23, the regulation for new power plants, passed on a 235-188 vote. Just a handful of Democrats joined Republicans in supporting the measures.Fierce reactionNongovernmental groups and Democrats lashed out at Republicans, saying that the GOP was wasting time on measures that have no chance of becoming law and are at odds with the warnings of climate scientists.“Once again Republicans are attempting to stop any action by this administration to reduce carbon emissions, and once again the opponents of EPA’s regulations have no constructive alternative to offer,” Rep. Frank Pallone (D–NJ), top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, said on the House floor before the votes.Republican lawmakers claimed that they weren’t denying climate science, but fighting back against the Obama administration’s misplaced focus on climate change. “No one on our side of the aisle has denied climate change, but I think we still live in a country where we all can express our views,” Whitfield said on the House floor. “And we simply disagree with the president on the urgency of the issue.”The resolutions enjoyed strong support from business groups and energy industries. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce wrote in a letter to lawmakers that the Clean Air Act “was never intended to regulate carbon dioxide, and it remains poorly designed for such a task … The impact these rules will have on power prices means they will inevitably have negative implications extending to nearly every segment of the economy.”Mary Anne Hitt, director of the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal campaign, expressed hope that the GOP and industry’s “attempts to distract the world” and undermine climate negotiations in Paris would fall flat. “They are wasting everyone’s time and the ink in President Obama’s veto pen,” she said in a statement. “It’s not going to work.”Rob Cowin, director of government affairs for the Climate and Energy Program at the Washington, D.C.–based Union of Concerned Scientists, said GOP leaders were essentially playing Grinch as Christmas looms on the horizon, “bah humbugging all attempts at international cooperation and constructive solutions to a very serious problem.” He also quipped that they were going beyond what the Grinch did. “In the end, the Grinch saw the fallacies of his ways,” he said in a statement. Congress has voted, largely along party lines, to block a centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s climate change agenda. The votes are largely symbolic, however, because Obama plans to veto the bills. Still, Congressional Republicans, and a few Democrats, say they want to send a message to global leaders who are meeting this week to negotiate a new climate agreement that the majority of U.S. lawmakers may not agree with any deal.The U.S. House of Representatives yesterday approved two measures that would block the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) first-ever limits on carbon dioxide emissions from existing and new power plants. The votes came 2 weeks after the Senate approved the same two measures, S.J. Res. 23 and S.J. Res. 24.“The message could not be more clear that Republicans and Democrats in both the U.S. Senate and U.S. House do not support the president’s climate agenda and the international community should take note,” Senator James Inhofe (R–OK), chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, said in a statement. 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You could probably have outrun a T rex

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A rare set of tyrannosaur footprints is giving researchers insight into the walking speed of the prehistoric beasts, and it’s possible that humans might have been able to outrun them. According to the new estimate, Tyrannosaurus rex may have ambled as quickly as 8 kilometers per hour (5 miles per hour), slower than a plodding amateur marathon runner or even a middle-aged power walker.Fossilized tyrannosaur tracks are rare, even in areas where their skeletal fossils are abundant, says Scott Persons, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Alberta, Edmonton in Canada, and lead author of the new study. Well-preserved individual tracks can be used to help identify the size and type of dinosaur that created the imprint. Even rarer sets of footprints, or trackways, can reveal more, says Persons, as the spacing and arrangement of individual footprints can provide insights into dinosaur gaits and walking speeds.Containing three footprints, the new trackway was found in 66-million-year-old rocks that formed along an ancient shoreline in what is now Wyoming. The first footprint is well preserved, with three toes facing forward and one short, thumblike toe facing rearward. This arrangement marks its maker as a meat-eating theropod dinosaur, Persons says. The only theropods known to have lived in the region at the time—and large enough to have created the 47-centimeter-wide track—were tyrannosaurs. If the trackmaker were the mighty T. rex, it probably would have been an adolescent. The other possibility, says Persons, is a smaller theropod called Nanotyrannus lancensis, which some paleontologists suggest is merely an immature T. rex, as opposed to a separate species. Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Whatever species made the track, the calculations reveal that the creature had a “brisk walking speed,” Persons says. To figure out just how fast it was moving, Persons and his team first estimated how high the dinosaur’s hips must have been above the ground, based on the length of the footprint. Using two common formulas, they determined the creature’s hips were likely somewhere between 1.56 and 2.07 meters off the ground. Then, they measured the distance between the footprints and used an equation based on observations of living, walking bipeds to estimate the dinosaur’s walking speed, yielding a result between 4.5 and 8 kilometers per hour (2.8 to 5 miles per hour), they report online this month and in a forthcoming print issue of Cretaceous Research.The team’s findings “are on par for what little data we have for tyrannosaurs,” says Richard McCrea, a paleontologist at the Peace Region Paleontology Research Centre in Tumbler Ridge, Canada.The analysis doesn’t prove that T. Rex couldn’t have gone faster, however. Because trackways are records of single events—one walk along a lakeshore, for example—the odds are that any particular set of footprints doesn’t capture a dinosaur’s peak performance, says Thomas Holtz Jr., a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Maryland, College Park. Moreover, he notes, the types of sediment that are good for preserving footprints are typically wet and sloppy, not the best surface on which a dinosaur could run full speed. McCrea agrees: “There are as yet no known trackways of running tyrannosaurs, so we don’t know for sure just what their upper speed limit was.”One previous study of a single footprint of a large tyrannosaur suggests that the beast could have been traveling as fast as 11 kilometers per hour (6.8 miles per hour), says Eric Snively, a vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse. That’s still a speed that a halfway decent amateur runner could beat. “If you were out walking a juvenile T. rex, you’d be comfortable at a brisk walk,” he says. “If you were walking an adult, you’d be jogging.”last_img read more

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Volcanoes may have triggered riots in ancient Egypt

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Yearly flooding along the lower Nile (green swath, above) was critically important for agriculture in ancient Egypt, but a new study suggests climate-changing volcanic eruptions occasionally stifled floods. Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC Volcanoes may have triggered riots in ancient Egypt Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Famine is no pharaoh’s friend—just ask Cleopatra or Ptolemy III. But those rulers may have had more to blame than just bad luck: According to a new study, volcanic eruptions around the ancient world likely suppressed the Nile’s annual floods—critical for agriculture—by altering rainfall upriver in the Ethiopian highlands several times from the third to first centuries B.C.E. The climatic consequences of those eruptions may have helped trigger tax riots and other forms of social unrest, social scientists say.“This is a terrific combination of scientific and humanities research,” says Graham Oliver, a historian at Brown University who wasn’t involved in the new analysis. “[It’s] a really important contribution to our understanding of the ancient world.”Long before the use of sophisticated irrigation equipment, those along the lower Nile relied on natural flooding in the late summer and fall to deliver water—and fertile sediment—to the floodplains where they farmed their crops, says Francis Ludlow, a historical climatologist at Trinity College in Dublin. Without the floods, the soil became parched, boosting the risk of crop failure the following year. On average, 85% of the Nile’s flow originates from rains in the highlands of Ethiopia. Email By Sid PerkinsOct. 17, 2017 , 11:00 AM Elsewhere in the world, volcanoes were erupting, as shown by higher levels of sulfates in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. In modern times, such eruptions have been linked to low summer flooding along the Nile. To find out just how low, Ludlow and his colleagues turned to the Islamic Nilometer, the longest running annual measurement of river flow, which records the highest level of the Nile from 622 to 1902. The team found that flood levels in the 60 years with volcanic eruptions were about 22 centimeters lower, on average, than they were in years without eruptions, they report today in Nature Communications.Once the team discovered the link between volcanic eruptions and reduced Nile flooding, they turned their attention to more ancient times—specifically, to the period from 305 B.C.E. to 30 B.C.E., when Greeks ruled a dynasty centered in Egypt. They used climate simulations to estimate the effects of volcanic eruptions on summer monsoon rainfall in the Ethiopian highlands. Those analyses suggested that large eruptions indeed reduced the rainfall needed to trigger fall floods along the lower Nile. This likely happened when volcano-spewed sulfur dioxide wafted high into the atmosphere, scattering sunlight back into space and briefly lowering global temperature and changing precipitation patterns, among other effects.“It’s clear that volcanic eruptions systematically suppressed Nile flow,” says Joseph Manning, a historian at Yale University and co-author of the new analysis.Separate analyses of documents from ancient Egypt—everything from inscriptions on monuments to tax records, poems, and letters—hint that eruptions may have contributed to social unrest, including riots, tensions between Egyptians and their Greek overlords, famines and plagues, and farmers abandoning their land and moving to the cities. In some cases, these effects came soon after the eruptions; in other cases, they didn’t occur until the following year. Ludlow and his colleagues are quick to point out that volcanic eruptions didn’t directly cause social unrest, but were instead possible triggers for already simmering tensions. “Many people think that history unfolds on a blank chessboard and that the environment is not a factor, but of course it is,” Ludlow says.The team’s analysis is very convincing, says Heli Huhtamaa, a climate historian at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. Using a variety of records “is an important part of putting together the effects of the eruptions,” she notes.But some scientists are skeptical, including Kenneth Verosub, a geophysicist at the University of California, Davis. For one thing, he thinks the team should have compared the results of their climate simulations with real-world data such as tree-ring data from the Ethiopian highlands.Interpreting ancient documents is “often very complicated,” Manning says. Plus, he notes, for some periods within the 3 centuries of Greek rule in Egypt, documents such as tax records aren’t readily available. But that lack may itself be a clue, he says, suggesting a loss of state control of Egyptian society.last_img read more

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Moving DNA to a different part of the nucleus can change how

first_img Moving DNA to a different part of the nucleus can change how it works Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Elizabeth PennisiOct. 11, 2018 , 11:00 AM Researchers demonstrated that the technique worked by shifting several gene pairs from central locations (above right) to the edge of the nucleus (above left). They also used the technique to move stretches of DNA known as telomeres—the tips of chromosomes implicated in aging. When they moved the telomeres to the inner edge of the nucleus, the cell grew much more slowly, if at all. But when they put telomeres close to cajal bodies, aggregations of proteins and genetic material that process RNA, the cell perked up: It grew faster and divided sooner than usual. Thus, the researchers conclude, the positioning of the telomeres is very important to keeping a cell healthy and productive.Other researchers say they are impressed with the new CRISPR-GO technique. (GO stands for “genome organization.”) That’s because it opens up a whole new way of altering the organization of the genome, which could pave the way toward a better understanding how the nucleus works and possibly lead to finer control over gene activity to slow aging or prevent disease. Email H. Wang et al., Cell 10.1016 (2018) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Though the 3 meters of DNA inside the nuclei of our cells looks like a jumbled pile of spaghetti, the genome is, in fact, pretty well organized. Now, scientists have discovered—using a modified version of the gene-editing tool CRISPR—that the location of DNA, not just the order of its base pairs, can make a critical difference in how certain parts of the genome work.The nucleus is dynamic, with everything—the chromosomes, the nucleolus, and so on—swirling around seemingly randomly. But in the past decade, researchers have realized that DNA on chromosomes inside can reposition itself in specific ways, ways that may alter the activity of the genes being moved. But, until now, they had no good way of proving that hypothesis.Enter CRISPR: Bioengineers have retooled the gene-editing technique to move specific stretches of DNA from one place to another inside the nucleus itself, they report today in Cell. First, they attach the DNA to a protein that, when prompted by the plant hormone abscisic acid, selectively links up with another protein found only in the target location. The second protein then “snags” the attached DNA, holding it fast in the desired spot. Removing the abscisic acid loosens the connection, freeing the DNA.last_img read more

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Watch an ant rip apart a spiderweb to rescue a sibling

first_img Ants are famous for putting themselves at risk for the wellbeing of their colony, but desert harvester ants (Veromessor pergandei) are especially heroic. New research suggests the insects charge into spiderwebs to rescue their ensnared nestmates, sometimes ripping the silk apart to free them.Researchers first observed the fearless ants in 2015 in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. Not only did the insects free their comrades from the sticky silk, they dismantled the entire web afterward, ripping it apart with their jaws for up to 2 hours, the team reports in The American Naturalist. The rescues weren’t without personal risk; about 6% of rescuers got stuck in the silk themselves or were captured by the spider lurking nearby.When the scientists brought the ants back to their lab, they discovered that the insects ignored empty webs. Their valor is likely spurred by chemical distress signals put out by their web-bound siblings, the team suspects. By Jake BuehlerJun. 7, 2019 , 12:25 PM Watch an ant rip apart a spiderweb to rescue a sibling Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The findings put desert harvester ants in an exclusive club of animals that engage in “rescue behavior,” which is typically reserved for mammals like primates and dolphins. Even rarer are those that destroy traps, limited among vertebrates to two groups of chimpanzees and mountain gorillas that disassemble poachers’ snares.The researchers think the ants’ heroic streak may have evolved because V. pergandei has to collect enough seeds for the colony to produce hundreds of new ants daily. This makes every forager’s life—and their labor—indispensable.last_img read more

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Panel investigating bullying harassment at UNAIDS finds boys club calls for firing

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe And Paula Donovan, co-director of the international advocacy group AIDS-Free World in New York City, issued a statement saying, “The report points to one brutally obvious conclusion: Abuse of power reigns when the UN is allowed to police itself. The UN system must be overhauled to put oversight in the hands of authorities who are truly independent. In 30 years, I have never heard of an independent report that delivered such a scathing indictment of internal UN leadership.”“This is a clear wake-up call for UNAIDS,” says Robin Gorna, former executive director of the International AIDS Society in Geneva. “The report demands big change and fundamental reform. Of course, it is distressing to see the agency’s failings laid bare. And it is also a massive relief for the women (and men) whose lives have been so badly damaged, to know that at last they have been truly heard. The UNAIDS Board must now find the courage to make the huge changes that are essential if the U.N. is to rediscover its moral compass, to refocus on its core mandate, and nurture the people who are determined to work together to end the AIDS crisis.”UNAIDS issued a 54-page “management response” to the panel report, but Sidibé shows no signs of stepping down immediately. “I have taken on board the criticisms made by the Panel,” he said in a statement. “In proposing this agenda, I am confident that we can focus on moving forward. I will spend the next 12 months implementing this agenda for change and making the UNAIDS workplace one where everyone feels safe and included.” An independent panel that reviewed the culture at the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) in Geneva, Switzerland, has issued a scathing report that calls for the ouster of Executive Director Michel Sidibé. The panel, which was initiated in July by Sidibé after public allegations of bullying, sexual harassment, and abuse were leveled at UNAIDS, interviewed and surveyed a total of 500 staffers. It concluded that a “boy’s club” culture exists that does not effectively prevent or address sexual harassment, bullying, and abuse of power.The panel said UNAIDS has a “vacuum of accountability” and concluded: “The UNAIDS Secretariat is in crisis, a crisis which threatens its vital work.” UNAIDS issues authoritative epidemiological updates about the epidemic, highlights shortcomings in responses and funding, and leads campaigns to address problems.“This is a damning indictment of the senior management of UNAIDS; radical reform is now essential. First Michel Sidibé has to resign. He was the right appointment once but now he is the biggest blockage to change,” says Gareth Thomas, a member of the U.K. Parliament for Harrow West and former U.K. minister for international development who supported Sidibé’s appointment. By Jon CohenDec. 7, 2018 , 12:20 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A report on the culture of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS calls for the firing of Michel Sidibé, its executive director.center_img Panel investigating bullying, harassment at UNAIDS finds ‘boy’s club,’ calls for firing of head Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Denis Balibouse/REUTERS Emaillast_img read more

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Space magnet homes in on clue to dark matter

first_img 1 10 20 30 40 50 Positron flux (times energy cubed) 1 Previous missions Alpha MagneticSpectrometer 100 10 Energy (giga-electron volts) Falloff 1000 Every explanation for the positron excess has significant problems, cosmic ray experts say, but Ting insists the AMS may still sort it all out. The detector could run for the remaining life span of the ISS, perhaps until 2024. The AMS team will then have twice as many data, enough to tell whether the positron spectrum dives as steeply as dark matter scenarios predict, Ting says. Stephane Coutu, a physicist at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, disagrees. Doubling the data will shrink the error bars just 30%, he says, too little to resolve the issue. “They’re basically done,” Coutu says. “The rest is gilding a lily.”In May 2018, a federal advisory panel reached a similar conclusion. In 2017, the White House proposed slashing DOE’s research budget by 17%. In response, officials in DOE’s high energy physics program, which funds the AMS’s $4.5 million operating budget, held a review to rank 13 ongoing projects. The AMS tied for last. The problem lay not with the experiment, but with the theories to interpret its data, says Paul Grannis, a physicist at the State University of New York in Stony Brook who led the review. The theoretical uncertainties are “so big that anything you could do to improve the data will have very little impact,” Grannis says. In the end, Congress boosted the 2018 high energy physics budget by 10%, and DOE officials say they have no plans to cut the AMS.Ting is also holding out for a different jaw-dropping discovery: heavy antimatter nuclei. It would be huge because antinuclei heavier than a deuteron—a proton and a neutron—cannot be made in cosmic ray interactions and would have to originate in some region of the universe dominated by antimatter. Ting claims the AMS has captured a few antihelium nuclei. Coutu says a mountain of evidence already proves no antimatter regions exist, so the unpublished signals must be spurious, perhaps produced by misidentified helium nuclei.The antimatter claim, too, may remain untested. Despite last year’s reprieve, the AMS faces an uncertain future. Pumps that cool key detector components need replacing, and the fix will require a spacewalk, scheduled for October. “It’s no big deal,” Ting says, although he won’t guarantee success.If the AMS stops working, it will leave behind an outstanding legacy, even if it’s not the one Ting envisions. The detector has collected exquisite data on cosmic rays such as nuclei of helium, boron, beryllium, and carbon. The data are helping scientists understand what produces these ordinary cosmic rays, and how they journey through space. “The cosmic ray data that they’re producing is fantastic,” says Tarlé, often a vocal critic of Ting. “It wouldn’t have been done if Sam hadn’t convinced DOE and NASA to do it.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Adrian ChoFeb. 6, 2019 , 1:40 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In 2014, AMS researchers reported an unexpected flux of positrons that kicked in at energies above 10 giga-electron volts (GeV) and seemed to fade by about 300 GeV. The excess could come from dark matter particles colliding and annihilating one another to produce electron-positron pairs, and the energy of the falloff might point to the mass of the dark matter particles. Now, with three times as many data, AMS researchers have clearly resolved that energy cutoff. The positron excess starts at 25 GeV and falls sharply at 284 GeV, the 227-member AMS team reported last week in Physical Review Letters. “It’s important because you do start to see a turnaround” in the energy spectrum, Olinto says. The cutoff is consistent with heavy dark matter particles with a mass of about 800 GeV, the researchers report.The AMS paper acknowledges that dark matter annihilation is just one possible explanation for the positrons. They could also come from a mundane astrophysical object, such as a pulsar—a spinning neutron star. But Ting emphasizes the steepness of the cutoff. “The cutoff also goes very quickly, very similar to [the signal from] dark matter collisions,” he says.In a third possibility, the positrons could come from the interactions of cosmic rays themselves. Cosmic ray protons emerging from remnants of supernova explosions regularly slam into atomic nuclei in interstellar space to create “secondary” cosmic rays, including positrons. AMS researchers say they’ve ruled out that explanation for the signal, because the proton collisions should produce a long tail in the positron spectrum instead of a sharp falloff. But Greg Tarlé, a cosmic ray physicist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, says the AMS data reveal a telltale similarity between the energy spectrum of the positrons and that of the protons, supporting the idea that the protons are the source. “It’s the AMS data itself that give the best evidence for the positrons being secondaries,” Tarlé says. The space-based Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer has seen more positron antimatter than expected. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Space magnet homes in on clue to dark matter NASA A peculiar excess of positrons A rise and fall in the flux of positrons at higher energies could point to dark matter or conventional astrophysical sources. A costly and controversial space-based cosmic ray detector has found possible signs of dark matter, the invisible stuff thought to supply most of the universe’s mass. Or so says Samuel Ting, a particle physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge and leader of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which is perched on the International Space Station (ISS).However, time is running out for the aging detector, and many researchers are skeptical about the dark matter interpretation, which Ting dances around with typical coyness. “If you listen to the storyline, it does sound like that’s where we’re headed, but we never quite get there,” says Angela Olinto, a cosmic ray physicist at the University of Chicago in Illinois.The co-winner of the 1976 Nobel Prize in Physics, Ting, 83, jetted around the world to drum up $1.5 billion for the AMS, and wooed NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) into backing it. After astronauts bolted the 8500-kilogram, doughnut-shaped detector to the ISS in May 2011, it began to measure the mass, charge, and energy of the billions of cosmic rays—charged particles from space—that pass down its maw. Almost all of them are protons, electrons, and light nuclei such as helium, but a precious few consist of antimatter particles such as positrons. They stand out because, in the magnetic field of the AMS, their paths bend in the opposite direction from those of their matter counterparts. Email M. AGUILAR ET AL., PHYS. REV. LETT. 122, 041102, (2019), ADAPTED BY C. BICKEL/SCIENCE last_img read more

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Above Marilyn Monroes Crypt a Man is Buried FaceDown

first_imgMarilyn Monroe died tragically at the age of 36, leaving behind an enduring legend that has made her a beloved figure and timeless icon. The same cannot be said for Richard Poncher. Little is known about Poncher — by all accounts, he was a successful businessman and entrepreneur who provided for his family and lived until the grand age of 81.The L.A. Times reports that he met his wife Elsie when they were living in Chicago, and he once built two bullet-proof cars for Al Capone. Although he had mob connections, his widow goes on to say in the same L.A. Times article, “He wasn’t afraid to tackle anything. Besides that, he was a helluva nice guy.”Marilyn Monroe.The story goes that back in 1954, when Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn were going through their divorce, the Ponchers met DiMaggio at the Regency Hotel in New York and it was decided to buy the crypt above Marilyn situated in Pierce Brothers Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery.Monroe’s crypt, Pierce Brothers Westwood Village Memorial Park, Los Angeles, CA.It’s not clear whether Richard Poncher was a Marilyn fan at the time of purchase, but by the end of his life in 1986 he had apparently been bitten by Marilyn fever and had a rather unusual last request.Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953).Poncher’s widow, Elsie, recounts her husbands last request to the L.A. Times, “He said, ‘If I croak, if you don’t put me upside down over Marilyn, I’ll haunt you the rest of my life.’ ”Marilyn Monroe’s grave as of September, 1990 – Westwood Memorial Park Cemetery. Photo by Alan Light CC By 2.0That’s right, Richard Poncher requested to be buried face down over Marilyn Monroe. Elsie Poncher goes onto to report that this is exactly what happened. At his funeral she informed the funeral director of his last wish and when the ceremony ended, as told to the L.A. Times, “I was standing right there, and he turned him over.”Marilyn Monroe Iconic QuotesThe story made an international stir in 2009 when Elsie put the crypt above Marilyn Monroe up for sale on eBay. Her reasons for the sale were financial; she wanted to pay off her mortgage and the sale almost went through for a record $4.6 million.Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery. Photo by Ben Churchill CC By 2.0Unfortunately, this fell through, and Richard Poncher is still interred in the crypt above Marilyn. Elsie Poncher is now buried in the crypt next to him.There has been recent more controversy surrounding Marilyn’s final resting place. Fans were saddened by the news that Hugh Hefner upon his passing in 2017, would be taking up his spot next to her.Hefner in November 2010. Photo by Toglenn CC BY-SA 3.0He purchased the crypt in 1992 for $75,000 and is quoted in the L.A. Times as saying “I’m a believer in things symbolic. Spending eternity next to Marilyn is too sweet to pass up.” He credits Monroe with launching the Playboy Empire by making her the first ‘Sweetheart of the Month,’ the forerunner to ‘Playmate of the Month.’The photos caused controversy upon publication and nearly ruined Monroe’s career.Monroe at the Actors Studio, where she began studying method acting.He later admitted that he did not seek permission for the use of the photos and that he and Marilyn had never met in person.Read another story from us: Marilyn Monroe: the Bookworm who Fantasized about Sleeping with Albert EinsteinOther famous people laid to rest at Pierce Brothers Westwood Village Memorial Park include Natalie Wood, Dean Martin, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Tom Petty, Frank Zappa, Truman Capote and Farrah Fawcett.last_img read more

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Did a Man Named William Shakespeare Actually Exist

first_imgWilliam Shakespeare, poet and playwright at the court of Queen Elizabeth I, is one of Britain’s most celebrated national figures. He is widely regarded as the greatest writer and dramatist in the English language, and authored 39 plays and over 150 poems. However, since the 19th century, conspiracy theorists have been casting doubt over Shakespeare’s legacy.Is it possible that William Shakespeare was simply a pseudonym adopted by a powerful aristocratic writer who wanted to keep his identity a secret?Elizabeth Woodville (1437-1492), Queen Consort of Edward IV of England.The Shakespeare that we think we know may not even have existed at all.According to the BBC, questions over Shakespeare’s identity first arose in the 19th century, when his plays were undergoing a revival in British society.Victorian commentators simply could not reconcile the image of the literary genius that emerged from the page with the figure of the historical Shakespeare.Surely a man of such humble beginnings and apparently little education could not have produced so many literary masterpieces.The Chandos portrait of William Shakespeare, artist and authenticity unconfirmed. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London.These critics were known as “anti-Stratfordians,” and they argued that the author of the plays attributed to Shakespeare must have been someone of exceptional education and in possession of an extensive vocabulary. He (or she) must also have had intimate knowledge of the law, the royal court and aristocratic politics, in addition to being well-traveled and knowledgeable when it came to foreign affairs.The historical figure of William Shakespeare, however, does not fit this profile. He was born into a relatively low-status family in Stratford-upon-Avon, and there is no direct evidence that he ever received a proper education. Some scholars have even questioned whether he was literate at all.Portrait of Sir Francis Bacon by Frans Pourbus, 1617.Check out a video on some hilarious Shakespearean insults:According to History magazine, there are only six authenticated documents in which Shakespeare signed his own name, and no manuscripts that have been definitively proved to be in Shakespeare’s own handwriting. His signatures are barely legible, and contain multiple variant spellings of his name. As a result, some theorists have argued that Shakespeare himself was basically illiterate.If William Shakespeare didn’t write the plays and sonnets that are attributed to his name, then who did? One of the most popular candidates, favored by 19th century theorists, was Sir Francis Bacon, a scientist and philosopher who was a contemporary of Shakespeare.Statue of William Shakespeare outside the Carnegie Music Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Some theorists have found patterns between Shakespeare’s plays and Bacon’s writings that may suggest common authorship. For example, the large number of legal references in Shakespeare’s plays points to an author with a strong legal background, such as Bacon.Other scholars, such as Isaac Hull Platt, have even suggested that Bacon left ciphers and clues in the text of Shakespeare’s plays. For example, the obscure Latin word honorificabilitudinitatibus, which is found in Love’s Labour’s Lost is thought to be an anagram of Hi ludi F. Baconis nati tuiti orbi. This translates as “these plays, the offspring of F. Bacon, are preserved for the world.”Sir Francis Bacon, c. 1618.Although this theory was popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, another candidate has overtaken Bacon in popularity among anti-Stratfordians. Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford, was a keen poet and noted for his patronage of the theater.He was exceptionally well educated, widely traveled (especially in Italy), and had an intimate knowledge of Jacobean politics. He fit the profile of the Shakespearean author perfectly, and many now believe that he used the figure of Shakespeare as a pseudonym to protect himself from criticism by his aristocratic peers.William Shakespeare on engraving from “Shakspeare’s Dramatic Works, Vol. 1” published in 1849 in Boston.Other potential candidates include William Stanley, the 6th Earl of Derby, and Christopher Marlowe, the celebrated poet and playwright who was thought to have died in a bar brawl in 1593.According to the Guardian, conspiracy theorists suggest that Marlowe’s death was faked, to allow him to escape trial and conviction of being an atheist. He is then thought to have used the figure of Shakespeare to continue writing.Although these theories offer exciting possibilities, there is no direct evidence to suggest that any of these figures actually wrote the plays we now attribute to Shakespeare.In contrast, we have an abundance of documentary evidence to suggest that Shakespeare existed, that he lived in London and Stratford-upon-Avon, and that he earned his way as a playwright, actor and businessman. As a result, the vast majority of Shakespeare scholars continue to believe that he was the genuine author of these plays and poems.Read another story from us: The Fanciful Toilet Humor of MozartHowever, the lack of surviving manuscripts written in Shakespeare’s own hand means that people will continue to ask questions about his authorship. After all, as Shakespeare himself was well aware, everyone loves a good mystery!last_img read more

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July 19, 2019

A flight of fancy

first_imgNovember 1, 2017 Photo by Linda KorTaylor Elementary School students enjoyed a recent day at Freeman Park as emergency responders took time out of their busy schedules to allow the youngsters inside a fire truck, an ambulance and a helicopter. Ziein Hescock (right) sits in a Native Air helicopter while flight nurse Dan Weber (left) and flight paramedic Tanna Stalter (middle) show him how everything works. A flight of fancycenter_img RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

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Why there has been a surge in single mothers who work

first_imgBy New York Times | Published: May 31, 2019 7:51:01 am Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off single mothers, single mothers working, single mothers statistics world, world news The employment rate of single mothers climbed and the share on public assistance dropped. (Representational)Written by Claire Cain Miller and Ernie Tedeschi Best Of Express Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Advertising Though gig economy jobs (like driving for Uber or shopping for Instacart) are not consistently measured in the data, more single mothers are also doing these jobs in recent years, said Danika Dellor, executive director of WANDA, a Bay Area nonprofit that helps low-income single mothers with economic self-sufficiency.When unemployment is low, it becomes easier for groups with barriers to employment to find work, and research shows it particularly helps less advantaged families. (Employment has also increased for those with disabilities or criminal records and for the long-term unemployed). Employers might offer higher wages or benefits that could make working and parenting easier, like predictable schedules or remote working.Single mothers’ entry into work in the 1990s was also driven by a thriving economy and low unemployment, in addition to major policy changes. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, known as welfare reform, required many recipients to work and set an expiration date on benefits. The Clinton administration also expanded the earned-income tax credit for low earners, which becomes more generous the more people work.The employment rate of single mothers climbed and the share on public assistance dropped. But work requirements also left a significant number without jobs or federal aid — a group researchers describe as disconnected. They tend to have less education and younger children, and are more likely to be facing physical or mental health issues, substance-abuse problems or domestic violence.By 2016, there were roughly 3.3 million jobless single mothers and just 1.3 million families receiving welfare, known as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the lowest number since welfare reform was enacted, according to LaDonna Pavetti, vice president for family income support policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.Even people eligible for TANF have been applying for it at lower rates, largely because of the reputation that it is difficult to obtain, researchers said. The Trump administration has proposed adding similar work requirements for people receiving food and housing assistance and medical coverage.“Many safety-net programs have been eviscerated and work requirements have increased,” said Carol Burnett, executive director of the Mississippi Low Income Child Care Initiative, a nonprofit that supports working mothers. If more single mothers are working, she said, it’s for a simple reason: “They need the money.”At the same time, some states and cities have passed policies that help working families.One example is minimum wage increases. Areas that raised it most saw the largest rise in the rate of single mothers who work, the Times analysis found. (This doesn’t prove that the higher wages caused the return to work, though — areas with strong economies might have felt more confident raising minimum wages, for example.)There’s also some evidence, though not conclusive, that the expansion of Medicaid under the health care law might have increased employment, particularly for people with disabilities. Young single mothers’ participation increased 4 percentage points more in states that expanded Medicaid in 2014 versus those that didn’t.Paid leave has probably helped, too. Five states and the District of Columbia have enacted or expanded family leave since the beginning of 2016. Paid sick leave went into effect or was expanded in eight states and 13 cities, according to the National Partnership for Women and Families. Some companies have also expanded paid leave for hourly workers, who had often been excluded from these benefits.State spending on public pre-K has significantly increased each year since the 2015-16 school year, according to the National Institute for Early Education Research, and many cities have also begun offering public pre-K. Since the District of Columbia did so, the labor force participation rate of unmarried mothers with children under 5 has increased 13 percentage points, 4 points more than the increase for married mothers.Other more recent policies aimed at working families will probably add to the momentum, researchers said. At least half of states are considering proposals to create or expand state earned-income tax credits. And last year, Congress approved a $2.4 billion increase of the Child Care and Development Block Grant to provide federal child care assistance to states, the biggest increase since the program began in 1990.The tight labor market and piecemeal policies seem to be helping more single mothers afford to work. But they’re not enough on their own, researchers said, to address the deeper issues that make it a daily challenge to earn a living while caring for children in the United States — particularly if the economy slows. Advertising Taking stock of monsoon rain More Explained P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Top News For many, jobs don’t pay enough to cover the child care they need to work — so without policies like paid parental leave, sick leave and public preschool, they can’t afford to work.“We’re talking about mothers, but really we’re talking about the children they’re supporting,” said Matthew McKeever, chairman of the sociology department at Haverford College, who has studied single motherhood. “One of the major factors influencing the well-being of children in America is this economic inequality.”Those without a college degree account for almost all of the recent increase in young single mothers’ labor force participation. Employment has increased for young single mothers of all races, in both urban and rural areas.Jobs in nursing and in managing and moving inventory in warehouses had the highest growth in employment for young single mothers from 2015 to 2018. Retail and administrative jobs had the largest decline. “Even with increased wages and even with the changes that are being made around leave policy and the like, employees are still at the mercy of their employers,” said Kristin S. Seefeldt, an associate professor of social work and public policy at the University of Michigan. “The way we think about workers, it’s on us to take care of our personal and family issues. It’s embedded in our culture that it’s not the employer’s job to do that.” Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off Single mothers in the United States can face many barriers to employment, like finding affordable child care and predictable work schedules. For many, a sick child or a flat tire can mean a lost job.Yet since 2015, something surprising has happened: The share of young single mothers in the workforce has climbed about 4 percentage points, driven by those without college degrees, according to a New York Times analysis of Current Population Survey data. It’s a striking rise even compared with other groups of women who have increased their labor force participation during this period of very low unemployment.The last time single mothers’ labor force participation grew so rapidly was during the 1990s, driven by a thriving economy and major federal policy changes, including welfare overhaul and tax incentives. In recent years, though, there has been no new federal policy that would obviously encourage single mothers to work in large numbers. Advertising Instead, they seem to be responding to a patchwork of policies, both carrots and sticks. At the federal level, the safety net has become less reliable, so working for pay is increasingly their only option. But at the local one, new policies like paid leave and minimum wage increases have made it more feasible for single mothers to work. Together, these appear to have primed them to take advantage of the biggest driver of all: a highly competitive labor market.“The calculus of what makes sense changed a little bit,” said Pamela J. Loprest, a senior fellow studying low-income working families at the Urban Institute. Increased wages and family-friendly policies help “on the edges,” she said. “But as we say, there’s nothing like a strong economy to help everybody out.”There are 2.7 million mothers ages 25 to 34 who are not married or living with a partner. They make up around a quarter of all mothers in that age group.In addition to facing the daily challenges of raising and supporting children without the help of another parent, they tend to be poorer and less educated than other women their age. Roughly half make less than $30,000 a year, compared with just 20% of all young women. Half have only a high school diploma or less, compared with 29% of young women. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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